About Us!


Welcome to our page! We do our best to provide to-be and current bunny owners up-to-date info on the best care for their house rabbits. When we adopted our first bunny in 2005, there was almost nothing on the internet to tell us how to care for him. Just in the past few years, information has exploded online, and now it can be confusing! We try to simplify it by posting weekly articles on current issues, daily care, concerns, proper feeding, and other info so you can enjoy your house-bun! If you are just finding us, feel free to look through the older posts also. Please email us if you have any questions! Happy bunnies make happy hearts!
Email: thebunnyhut101@yahoo.com

Saturday, November 28, 2015

Bunny & The Holidays


Your Bunny & The Holidays
It's holiday season again, a time of year that can be both fun and stressful for you and your rabbit.
In the midst of all your holiday preparations, here a few tips to keep your bunny safe and happy over the holiday season.


 





















Plants & Christmas Trees
Be aware of seasonal plants that are brought into the home.



 


Despite common perception, Poinsettia plants are not poisonous. That's not to say your bunny should eat them, since they can cause mild intestinal discomfort in some sensitive individuals. But they should not cause serious illness.

Some holiday plants, such as holly, mistletoe and certain types of ivy, can be toxic. To be especially safe, keep ALL plants and fresh green decorations up and out of your bunny's reach. Put them in a room where your bunny doesn't usually romp, or place them high enough to be out of reach of little teeth.





 



Pinecones are generally safe distractions, and make festive bunny chew and throw toys at this time of year.

How To Give Pine Cones To Rabbits:
http://www.thebunnyhut101.com/2013/03/how-to-give-pine-cones-to-rabbits.html


If your Christmas tree has not been treated (with fire retardant, pesticides, etc) or painted, then it should be safe to chew. Note that natural chemical compounds in some evergreens may cause the bunny's urine to turn more orange than usual, but this is not a health concern.
Take a critical look at your tree before placing the ornaments and lights. Low hanging decoratoins could be inviting toys. On lower limbs, use safe plastic or wooden ornaments a rabbit can safely nibble, tug, or steal. Always supervise closely when bunny is loose around the tree.


Lights, Cords, Decorations
Those of you who have Christmas trees also may also have extra electrical cords and lights, which bunnies can and will chew. If possible, put your Christmas tree in a room where Bunny doesn't play. If this isn't possible, you can make your tree "off limits" to your rabbit by placing a puppy pen around it, or you can use the pen to section off the part of the room where the tree is, keeping bunny safely away. This will help keep you and your rabbit safe from chewed electrical cords and preserve your favorite Christmas ornaments, as well.
 

If you put up electrical decorations during this season, make sure the cords are well out of Bunny's reach. Plastic wire protectors from Radio Shack may help slow down a curious bunny. However, the wire wrap will not necessarily prevent a determined rabbit from chewing through the plastic to the wires. So after wrapping the cords in the wire wrap, you should still tuck them out of rabbit reach.

Be alert about synthetic tinsel and garland which, if ingested, could cause tummy trouble or impaction. And be conscious of potpourri. Some rabbits enjoy nibbling on it, and there's no telling what potentially harmful chemicals or preservatives might have been used in the potpourri you're using.






 While wrapping and opening gifts, keep in mind that tape and ribbon are not good things for rabbits to eat, but they seem to be especially attractive playthings to some bunnies. As a substitute, give white tissue paper and you'll enjoy watching some happy playtime.



'Tis the season for candles and fireplaces. Keep the first high out of reach and the other enclosed so your bunny can't investigate too closely. Even cold ashes can be harmful, as they are very caustic if combined with water (including saliva!).

Be aware of low-lying candy, snack bowls, and gingerbread homes, or your buns will have a (potentially dangerous) feast on holiday treats. Coffee tables and end tables are usually low enough for a healthy bunny to easily hop up and partake of your festive offerings. Salty snacks are particularly risky, since a rabbit can actually ingest a fatal overdose of salt if she eats too much (e.g., chips, salted nuts, etc.)



Company and the Hubbub of the Holidays
Many families have friends and family members for short or long visits around this time of year. This will inevitably interrupt your rabbit's customary routine and atmosphere. If you have family members who don't understand house rabbits, make sure you take the time to prepare both your company and your rabbit for what to expect. This could be a great opportunity to educate your friends and family about rabbits and rabbit behavior.

To reduce your rabbit's stress, try to stick as close as possible to her routine. Make sure you remember to give her plenty of attention and reassurance. If your bunny is particularly sensitive to noise and activity, you may even want to move her to a quieter room while your company is visiting.

Don't be shy about laying down some ground rules for your company, especially if they include children. Never leave your rabbit unsupervised with a child. Small visitors may be tempted to chase, pick up, or inadvertently mishandle your bunny. It could take only a second for a potentially crippling or even fatal accident to occur at the hands of a well-meaning, but overly affectionate child.

                                                       John explaining to Mr. T about Peter and having to be gentle.

If you have guests who are particularly interested in visiting your rabbit, don't allow them to handle the bunny without first properly instructing them about safe handling. Let visitors know that a rabbit's digestive system is very delicate, and though she may be adorable when she sits up and begs for treats, that giving in and overfeeding her could be killing her with kindness.

With these precautions in mind, we wish you and your bunnies a fun-filled, joyous Holiday Season!




 Footnote:
http://www.rabbit.org/care/holidays.html 






10 Reasons rescued rabbits make great pets


The annual Bunny Festival in Santa Barbara California was held Sunday, September 23, organized by Bunnies Urgently Needing Shelter (BUNS). The event featured adoptable rabbits, veterinarian visits and a lagomorph lounge. To encourage people to attend and consider getting a house rabbit for a pet, the Santa Barbara Independent News published an article by Rabbit Advocate founder, Mary Lempert, that gives ten good reasons why rabbits — and in particular rescued ones — make great pets:
  1. Rabbits are the perfect pets for those who may not have time for daily walks, but still seek the social quality of a dog-like companion.
  2. Like cats, rabbits can be litter box trained very easily. Many people who are allergic to dogs and cats are not allergic to rabbits.
  3. Rabbits are uniquely talented comedians. They “binky”—or hop and kick—when they’re happy. Some rabbits also flop over and play dead like a dog would!
  4. Rabbit schedules match up with people schedules. Our furry friends are most active at dawn and dusk, which corresponds well with the times most of us are starting our day or getting home from work and ready for some couch snuggling or binky watching.
  5. Rabbits help you get healthy. As herbivores, rabbits mesh well with vegetarian and vegan lifestyles. Generally speaking, though, having a pet that encourages you to stock your fridge with fruits and vegetables is good for everybody—vegetarians and meat-eaters alike.
  6. Rabbits make great pets for city dwellers. They happily stay in large cages or puppy pens during the day when you’re gone and love to come out to romp around in rabbit-proofed rooms when you’re home.
  7. Rabbits have long life spans compared to other small animals. They can live 10-12 years if provided with a proper diet and care.
  8. Rabbits are heroic. In the wild, rabbits communicate with each other about perceived dangers by thumping their back legs; astute house bunnies will provide you with a similar security system.
  9. Rabbits are great listeners (just look at those ears!). They also make excellent snugglers with their extra-soft fur and loving nature.
  10. Rabbits need homes, too. Perhaps one of the best reasons to adopt a bunny is that there are so many waiting for forever homes. In fact, after dogs and cats, rabbits are the third most abundant adoptable pet, with more than 5,500 listed for adoption on www.petfinder.com
* http://hoppingtonpost.com/10-reasons-rescued-rabbits-make-great-pets/#more-539

Think, Learn, Prepare, THEN Adopt!

Many adopters love the IDEA of having a rabbit for a pet, but in the long-term caring of the bunny, loose interest in the daily interaction the bunny needs. This causes the bunny to find ways to keep itself from being bored by becoming destructive. This is like any other puppy, dog, or pet that is active and needs to feel like they are a part of the family everyday. Study what having a rabbit is about before taking one home. They don't want to be rejected and unloved any more than another part of your family would. 

Life expectancy: varies with breed, anywhere from 5 to 15 years.

Why Rabbits Can Make Good Pets
  • Rabbits are social and with gentle handling are generally quite tame.
  • They are playful and entertaining to watch.
  • Rabbits often form very close bonds with their owners.
  • They can be litter trained. They also respond well to gentle training (try a clicker) and can be trained to do special behaviors and tricks.
What You Need to Know Before Deciding on a Rabbit
  • Being social, rabbits need a great deal of interaction with their owners and/or other rabbits to be happy. Daily playtime and exercise outside of their case are a necessity.
  • Rabbits are not low maintenance - it takes a good deal of work to properly care for a rabbit.
  • Rabbit pellets alone are not a sufficient diet -- they need lots of roughage in the form of good quality hay and a variety of fresh vegetables.
  • They do need to chew, so lots of safe chew toys should be provided, and any spaces where the rabbit is allowed to run must be carefully rabbit-proofed.
  • They need a relatively large cage. They are also better off indoors, where they can be more social with their family and also are also safe from predators (even in the city) and extreme weather.
  • While they are generally quiet pets, rabbits are not a good match for active young children who may not be careful enough when picking them up or playing around them.
  • Rabbits like to be near their people, but they often would rather not be held.
  • They will likely require some veterinary care, which can be expensive. They should be spayed or neutered (by a vet experienced with surgery on rabbits).
  • Rabbit urine can have a strong odor so expect to change their litter box frequently (spaying and neutering can help reduce the odor. In addition their urine is high in calcium so can leave a chalky residue when it dries that can be hard to clean up (vinegar is pretty effective for this).
More on very important aspects of rabbit care can be found in the Rabbit Care Guide Consider Adopting a Shelter Rabbit
Please consider adopting an rabbit from a shelter or rescue if you have one nearby. There are many perfectly good pet rabbits who need a second chance at finding a forever home. Don't worry about getting an older rabbit--you can get a good sense of their personality and they will bond with new owners just fine.

 If you are considering a pet bunny, but live in apartment, make sure you know what you're getting yourself into and do plenty of research.

A Place of Bunny's Own

You can't expect to bring your new bunny home and let her loose to live in your apartment as she pleases. She needs a place to call her very own. Of course you will probably bring her home in a little cage that is her's, but she needs somewhere she can be alone that will fit at least 5x her. So, a 15" x 25" cage won't cut it.
Ideally, bunny's should get their own room. A BUNNY PROOF room (read about bunny-proofing below). This way she can have her own space and run around while not disturbing your space. Of course you can let her out to run around, but she must always be supervised while not in her space. Otherwise she may poop, pee, and chew her way to your insanity.
Of course if you live in an apartment, you probably can't give your bunny a whole room. That's why you build a bunny condo! These are like super nice cages for your hoppy friend to lay out, poop, eat, climb and play without ruining your life. A bunny condo won't cost you more than $70 to make, but if you're lazy you can buy a nice one for under $200.






Bunny Proofing

Bunny Proofing is VERY important. Do not convince yourself that your bunny won't chew your stereo wires, or won't pee on your $500 couch. Bunnies love to help you redecorate, by stripping that ugly wallpaper, pulling up your old carpet, and forcing you to buy new electronics. Your bunny must be kept where no wires are exposed, no peeling wallpaper, preferably no wood paneling, and if you can help it, no carpet. If you are stuck with carpet, you can put down straw mats that your bunny can chew on instead of the carpet, but you'll need to replace them and of course constantly keep an eye out.
It may be impossible to bunny proof the entire apartment, but if your room has a lot of wires or your bathroom has lots of chewables, close those doors while the bunny is out and you may need to do some reorganization to keep bunny out of places she shouldn't be! Remember: Bunnies are GREAT jumpers!

Potty Training your Bunny

Yes! Bunnies can be trained for litter boxes! But they aren't quite as easy as cats. Bunnies like to poop and pee in corners, so when you first get your new friend, keep a look out for these spots. The easiest way to train your bunny is to put several boxes out where she will most likely to potty. You might need 4 or 5 boxes. In her cage put one where she likes to potty the most (you'll figure it out pretty quick). When you catch her using a litter box, give her a treat and pet her so she knows how well she did. Pretty soon, you can start removing a box at a time, and as long as she has one box per room, she should pretty much always use them.
Litter boxes can be like the ones for cats or you can just get a cardboard box, big enough for your bunny to jump in. Don't use cat litter. Use wood shavings and hay, and try to clean them out as often as possible.Bunny pee is pretty stinky. But as long as you are diligent about helping the bunny to use the litter box, it'll be smooth sailing.

All Other Rules Apply

You must keep everything else in mind when getting a pet bunny, whether it's an apartment or a house or living outside.
If you're in college: remember you may not be able to have animals in the apartment! Most apartments on my campus don't allow pets, so make sure to check before you get a pet!

Remember that bunnies need a lot of love and attention. Most bunnies don't like to be held, but once they learn who are you and get comfortable with you, they would love to hop in your lap and snuggle there. Bunnies will chase you and dance around your feet and jump up on everything to be close to you. The most important thing is that you must always keep an eye on your bunny while she out and also: they eat a lot more than carrots! A balanced diet is important with romaine lettuce, veggies, as much Timothy hay as they want, fruits, and dry Timothy pellets (but not usually more than 1/2 cup a day.)
Have fun with your new friend!
_____________________________________________________________________



**http://elizabethbelow.hubpages.com/hub/Bunnies-and-Apartment-Life

* http://exoticpets.about.com/od/rabbits/f/choosingrabbit.htm

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Bunny & The Holidays

Your Bunny & The Holidays
It's holiday season again, a time of year that can be both fun and stressful for you and your rabbit.
In the midst of all your holiday preparations, here a few tips to keep your bunny safe and happy over the holiday season.


 





















Plants & Christmas Trees
Be aware of seasonal plants that are brought into the home.



 


Despite common perception, Poinsettia plants are not poisonous. That's not to say your bunny should eat them, since they can cause mild intestinal discomfort in some sensitive individuals. But they should not cause serious illness.

Some holiday plants, such as holly, mistletoe and certain types of ivy, can be toxic. To be especially safe, keep ALL plants and fresh green decorations up and out of your bunny's reach. Put them in a room where your bunny doesn't usually romp, or place them high enough to be out of reach of little teeth.





 



Pinecones are generally safe distractions, and make festive bunny chew and throw toys at this time of year.

How To Give Pine Cones To Rabbits:
http://www.thebunnyhut101.com/2013/03/how-to-give-pine-cones-to-rabbits.html


If your Christmas tree has not been treated (with fire retardant, pesticides, etc) or painted, then it should be safe to chew. Note that natural chemical compounds in some evergreens may cause the bunny's urine to turn more orange than usual, but this is not a health concern.
Take a critical look at your tree before placing the ornaments and lights. Low hanging decoratoins could be inviting toys. On lower limbs, use safe plastic or wooden ornaments a rabbit can safely nibble, tug, or steal. Always supervise closely when bunny is loose around the tree.


Lights, Cords, Decorations
Those of you who have Christmas trees also may also have extra electrical cords and lights, which bunnies can and will chew. If possible, put your Christmas tree in a room where Bunny doesn't play. If this isn't possible, you can make your tree "off limits" to your rabbit by placing a puppy pen around it, or you can use the pen to section off the part of the room where the tree is, keeping bunny safely away. This will help keep you and your rabbit safe from chewed electrical cords and preserve your favorite Christmas ornaments, as well.
 

If you put up electrical decorations during this season, make sure the cords are well out of Bunny's reach. Plastic wire protectors from Radio Shack may help slow down a curious bunny. However, the wire wrap will not necessarily prevent a determined rabbit from chewing through the plastic to the wires. So after wrapping the cords in the wire wrap, you should still tuck them out of rabbit reach.

Be alert about synthetic tinsel and garland which, if ingested, could cause tummy trouble or impaction. And be conscious of potpourri. Some rabbits enjoy nibbling on it, and there's no telling what potentially harmful chemicals or preservatives might have been used in the potpourri you're using.






 While wrapping and opening gifts, keep in mind that tape and ribbon are not good things for rabbits to eat, but they seem to be especially attractive playthings to some bunnies. As a substitute, give white tissue paper and you'll enjoy watching some happy playtime.



'Tis the season for candles and fireplaces. Keep the first high out of reach and the other enclosed so your bunny can't investigate too closely. Even cold ashes can be harmful, as they are very caustic if combined with water (including saliva!).

Be aware of low-lying candy, snack bowls, and gingerbread homes, or your buns will have a (potentially dangerous) feast on holiday treats. Coffee tables and end tables are usually low enough for a healthy bunny to easily hop up and partake of your festive offerings. Salty snacks are particularly risky, since a rabbit can actually ingest a fatal overdose of salt if she eats too much (e.g., chips, salted nuts, etc.)



Company and the Hubbub of the Holidays
Many families have friends and family members for short or long visits around this time of year. This will inevitably interrupt your rabbit's customary routine and atmosphere. If you have family members who don't understand house rabbits, make sure you take the time to prepare both your company and your rabbit for what to expect. This could be a great opportunity to educate your friends and family about rabbits and rabbit behavior.

To reduce your rabbit's stress, try to stick as close as possible to her routine. Make sure you remember to give her plenty of attention and reassurance. If your bunny is particularly sensitive to noise and activity, you may even want to move her to a quieter room while your company is visiting.

Don't be shy about laying down some ground rules for your company, especially if they include children. Never leave your rabbit unsupervised with a child. Small visitors may be tempted to chase, pick up, or inadvertently mishandle your bunny. It could take only a second for a potentially crippling or even fatal accident to occur at the hands of a well-meaning, but overly affectionate child.

                                                       John explaining to Mr. T about Peter and having to be gentle.

If you have guests who are particularly interested in visiting your rabbit, don't allow them to handle the bunny without first properly instructing them about safe handling. Let visitors know that a rabbit's digestive system is very delicate, and though she may be adorable when she sits up and begs for treats, that giving in and overfeeding her could be killing her with kindness.

With these precautions in mind, we wish you and your bunnies a fun-filled, joyous Holiday Season!




 Footnote:
http://www.rabbit.org/care/holidays.html 


Thursday, November 12, 2015

Rabbit Dental Health


Although the pictures of the front teeth below are not typical, it does happen. The picture of the inside molars is an excellent example of the beginnings of the spurs that cause the bunny to stop eating, cause abscesses, eye problems and other issues. Good article!

 Rabbit Dental Health

Rabbit Dental Map
Rabbit
Rabbit Dental Map








Rabbits have strong teeth that allow them to chew a wide variety of grasses and vegetation. Unlike humans, a rabbit’s teeth grow continuously. As the rabbit eats, the tooth surfaces are ground down at a rate of about 3mm per week. When a rabbit’s jaw is at rest, its incisors touch but its cheek teeth do not. After using its incisors to shear off a mouthful of food, the rabbit adjusts its jaw position to allow the cheek teeth to meet and grind together. The rabbit does this by chewing with a wide side to side motion. Because of their specialized jaws and continuously erupting teeth, any abnormalities in jaw shape quickly lead to dental problems. Rabbit teeth also curve when they grow. If they become overgrown, they can rub against the cheek or tongue causing painful ulcers.
Rabbit Dental Problems
Rabbit Dental Problems










Overgrown incisors
Rabbit Overgrown Incisors









Spikes and spurs
Rabbit Spikes and spurs











Causes of Rabbit Dental Disease
Genetics
Skull and jaw abnormalities are common in domestic rabbits. Small abnormalities in the bone structure result in the teeth not meeting together properly. When the teeth do not occlude properly, the do not wear down evenly. This causes overgrown teeth, overgrown roots, spikes and spurs. Rabbits that have this condition need regular dentals to even out their teeth.

Diet
Rabbits’ teeth are designed for chewing large volumes of food. Grass hay should compose the majority of a rabbit’s diet. Vegetables and commercial rabbit pellets should form no more than 15-20% of the diet.

Trauma
If the jaw is broken, it may heal abnormally. If teeth fracture, they may grow back at an improper angle. The most common cause of tooth fractures is incisors fracturing when they are clipped at home. To avoid this, you should get your rabbits teeth clipped by your veterinarian.

Dental Infections
Dental infections are usually secondary to other dental problems. Uneven wear of teeth can lead to abnormally long roots, which cause inflammation and abscess formation. Rabbit abscesses tend to form pocket and tracts that spread the infection to other teeth, and into the jaw. Overgrown upper incisor roots can block the tear ducts. Bacteria proliferate in the blocked ducts, creating abscesses. You might notice swelling and discharge from the eye when this happens.

Systemic disease
Some systemic diseases can cause dental problems too. Regular visits to the vet will keep your rabbit’s body and teeth in good condition.

Treating and Preventing Rabbit Dental Disease• Make sure your rabbit eats a diet composed mostly of grass hay.
• Monitor your rabbit carefully for signs of dental disease (see symptoms of dental disease below).
•Bring your rabbit to your veterinarian for regular dental exams.
• If necessary, schedule regular dental surgery to grind down and trim overgrown teeth.
• Abscesses should be treated by your veterinarian as soon as you notice them. This may require a combination of antibiotics, surgery to remove or clean out the abscess, and extraction of affected teeth.

Symptoms of Rabbit Dental Disease
• Appetite loss, or unwillingness to eat certain foods
• Dropping food out of the mouth
• Salivating excessively
• Nasal or ocular discharge, excessive tear production
• Bulging eyes
• Tooth grinding
• Facial swelling

Why not call Eagle Ridge Animal and Bird Hospital today to schedule a dental exam for your rabbit.  Our veterinarians will work with you to keep your rabbit happy and healthy, and stop dental disease in its tracks.
Hugh Upjohn DVM, Eagle Ridge Animal and Bird Hospital


Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Litter Box & Screen Kit

"Setting up Bunny's Litterbox":
 http://www.thebunnyhut101.com/2013/11/litter-training-thank-goodness-video.html

You Tube Video:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0meP1irepto

Litter Box and Screen Kit
Litter Box and Screen Kit Mini-Thumbnail Litter Box and Screen Kit Mini-Thumbnail Litter Box and Screen Kit Mini-Thumbnail

Litter Box and Screen Kit

Litter Box and Screen Kit


Price: $12.95
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Litter Box & Screen Kit
Petmate Litterbox with Microban® antimicrobial fights the growth of stain and odor causing bacteria and mold. 
---combined with:

Litter Screen: 


This screen sits directly on litter. It is not a raised type of screen --- please see the video to see how it works. Check out our Product Feature video about the Litter Screen on YouTube
We created this for our own bunnies many years ago, and it's still in great shape. It saved us money on litter and kept our bunnies feet clean, so now we've decided to share what's worked for us, with you! 
As we all know rabbits like to get into their box not only to do their "business" but to also hang out and eat hay. They will get in and out many times throughout one 24 hour period. By doing this, the unused litter gets mixed with the urine soaked litter, poos and hay pieces, making it difficult to scoop the bad without wasting alot of the good.  With the screen, it allows the urine to soak through into a nice neat confined area which is easy to scoop up, and the poos sit on top of the screen, making them easy to throwout, while preserving the litter below.
NOTE: If you use sheets of paper or shredded paper for litter, this screen will not work well with it. -- Needs to be an absorbent litter like compressed pellets of paper or wood. 
Plus, the fact that it is so easy to just lift the screen and dump the poos daily makes it a cleaner place for your bunnies to hang out in. And if your bunny is a "digger" and loves to make a mess of his habitat, then this is the perfect solution.
When you put hay in the box like we do, the screen makes it even that much easier to separate it all and then just scoop out the soaked litter spots.

The galvanized metal handles acidic aspect of urine very well, and the tightly woven mesh screen makes it easier on bunnies sensitive hocks.

We've had the same litter box screen for over five years now and it's going strong--and with no less than two bunnies at one time it gets alot of action!  Plus, it has held up very well against our scrub brushes and soaking when needed.  

Cautionary Note: IF you have a larger bunny, a rex breed, or a bunny that likes to hang out in the litterbox, then we advise you to put a a little hay over the screen (as we did in the video) so that your bunnies feet are fully protected. 



Saturday, November 7, 2015

Proper Transportation of Bunny- Carriers & Car


Our Favorite type of carrier for 
rabbit transport



Rabbits are easily stressed and their transport represents a challenge. Allergens, sunlight, car lights, noise, hot or cold temperatures, and being subjected to visual observation by people or other animals could potentially stress a rabbit in a carrier. 
1. The carrier used for transporting should, thus, be sturdy so as to protect the animal from exposure to the environment as much as possible and prevent escape.  
2. The carrier should, furthermore, have a solid bottom, with no grid or holes that can cause injury.
Nylon or cloth pet carriers, as well as cardboard boxes, must be avoided since a rabbit can easily make holes in these materials. A rabbit that has escaped from the carrier in a car can lead to extremely dangerous situations. The rabbit can startle the driver by jumping onto his or her lap, thereby distracting the driver's attention and concentration away from the road, or the driver may need to locate the rabbit in the vehicle, all potential causes of accidents.  
A free roaming rabbit in a car can, moreover, be propelled through the windshield during a sudden unexpected stop.

Adar, a Flemish giant rabbit travelling by train

Never take chances !!!
A rabbit should travel in a sturdy carrier that ensures a safe environment.
The waiting room at the veterinary clinic is a further source of stress for the rabbit. When removed from the safe environment of its carrier, it may panic, bite, and scratch in an attempt to escape
The carrier of choice has a front opening and a top opening:
Duncan

Front door
Top opening

The top opening is convenient for checking on the rabbit, petting, feeding, or giving fresh drinking water during a stop. The rabbit cannot get out and escape as easily as through the front. If the rabbit reaches up to the top opening, it can be gently pushed down in the carrier.

Escape through the front door is easy…
A top opening requires some effort to escape


A top opening is, furthermore, useful during a visit to the veterinarian. 
Usually, the rabbit can be picked up through the top opening without much trouble, with a firm hold to avoid escape, and support of the lower spine region and hip of the rabbit to avoid fracture.

For safe carrying methods of a rabbit, see:Safe carrying of a rabbit” 

http://www.medirabbit.com/EN/Surgery/Restraint/Handling.htm 

Padding of the transport carrier
The plastic bottom of carriers is slippery and does not give support and traction to the rabbit during transport, especially when unexpected motion occurs. The rabbit can hurt itself, fracture a limb or the spine, or luxate a shoulder or hip. For maximum safety the rabbit should be placed in a carrier padded with soft bedding, e.g., a cushion, towels, or a blanket to ensure safe transport. If the road is rough, or the rabbit suffers from health tilt or balance problems, the sides of the carrier can be padded with rolled towels.

Slippery floor
Cushion providing a good hold
Ventilation of the transport carrier
The carrier should have enough openings on all sides to enable proper flow of fresh air during transport. A cover or a towel will help protect the rabbit against drafts, cold winds, or freezing temperatures. 

Cover made of cotton cloth material
 Two zippers enable removal of the cover, opening of the top door, and easy lifting out of the rabbit
Size of a carrier
Aside price and quality, the choice of carrier depends on the size and number of rabbits that will travel in it. It should not be oversized nor overcrowded. The carrier should provide comfort and allow lying down and stretching out.



Different carriers used to transport one to two rabbits:
·           The smallest (left, 27*43 cm / 10.6*17.2’’, 30 cm / 12’’ high) can transport two dwarf rabbits or one small sized rabbit.
·           A mid-sized carrier (30*46 cm / 11.8*18.1’’, 36 cm / 14.1’’ high) can be used for one giant breed or two medium sized rabbits.
·           The folding carrier (right, 46*54 cm / 18.1*21.3’’, 35 cm / 13.8’’ high) was used to transport a giant Flemish giant and a medium sized rabbit.

 *************************************************

                        Safe transport by car

Transportation in a carrier should not take longer than is necessary for traveling from home to the veterinary clinic. If the trip is long, stops should be scheduled at regular intervals. The car should be well ventilated and the inside temperature not reach higher than 24°C (75.2°F). Unless restricted by the veterinarian (e.g., before surgery), food, hay, and water should be supplied. Fresh vegetables or herbs can be provided if the trip is long.
The carrier with the rabbit should never be left unattended in a car, even when parked in the shade. Temperatures inside cars quickly climb to 30 to 50°C (86 to 122°F) on summer days, even when a window is left open for ventilation. The environment in the parked car can very quickly become fatal to the rabbit.
Several methods are available for proper and safe transport of rabbits. The following pictures present safe methods of transporting rabbits in a carrier by car. Depending on the car, the experience of the owner, and the size and weight of the carrier+rabbit, safe car transport methods may differ slightly. 



The carrier can be placed with the front opening facing forward. This will enable fresh air to enter.
This carrier is wrapped in a protective cover made of thin cotton cloth. This enables ventilation, but prevents the rabbit from seeing its surroundings. It also protects against drafts and cold winds.

                                     
 A towel or small blanket (arrow) is used under the carrier to level it on the car seat.


                                    
 The carrier can be placed with its front facing to the side. When placing it this way, it must be ensured that fresh air can enter and there is proper ventilation. 


     
 A towel or small blanket (arrow) is used under the carrier to level and stabilize it on the car seat.


 When the carrier is placed on a seat, it should be secured with the seatbelt to keep it from falling, moving, or even being hurled accidentally into the windshield should unexpected braking or stopping occur.



 The carrier can also be placed on the floor in front of the seat. To decrease vibrations during the drive, a towel or a blanket can be placed underneath the carrier.



 The carrier can be placed in the back of a station wagon.
The floor of the car should be skid proof or covered with non-slippery material. The carrier must then be secured so it cannot move or roll over.
If the floor is slippery, the carrier must be secured with bungee cords or strong rope. NEVER use adhesive tape.

                        
                          NOT SAFE                                   

 The carrier is not level. This puts enormous strain on the limbs and hip joints of the rabbit, which cannot sit or lay comfortably when the carrier is at an angle. 



The carrier is not level. This puts enormous strain on the limbs and hip joints of the rabbit, which cannot sit or lay comfortably when the carrier is at an angle.


 Although the carrier is kept horizontal, holding it on the lap is not safe.
During a sudden stop it can slip and fall or even be flung through the windshield of the car.                 



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Transport, Restraint and Manipulation of Rabbits

Paperback, 40 Pages

http://www.lulu.com/shop/esther-van-praag-and-amir-maurer/transport-restraint-and-manipulation-of-rabbits/paperback/product-18726008.html

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Footnotes:

http://www.medirabbit.com/EN/Transport/Carrier/Carrier.htm  

http://www.medirabbit.com/EN/Transport/Car/Car.htm