About Us!


Welcome to our page! We do our best to provide to-be and current bunny owners up-to-date info on the best care for their house rabbits. When we adopted our first bunny in 2005, there was almost nothing on the internet to tell us how to care for him. Just in the past few years, information has exploded online, and now it can be confusing! We try to simplify it by posting weekly articles on current issues, daily care, concerns, proper feeding, and other info so you can enjoy your house-bun! If you are just finding us, feel free to look through the older posts also. Please email us if you have any questions! Happy bunnies make happy hearts!
Email: thebunnyhut101@yahoo.com

Saturday, January 30, 2016

How To Treat Eye Infections In Rabbits

**If any of the signs described in this article are like the symptoms your rabbit is having, it is important to visit your vet in case the rabbit has something that can't be seen without special equipment or treatments. (A scratch on the eye will need a special dye to detect, for example, and most likely an antibiotic.)



There are many reasons for rabbits to get eye infections, and it is important for owners to understand that treating the causes is just as important as treating the infection itself. Many causes can be prevented, while others are simply put down to being “one of those things”.

The signs of an eye infection usually consist of a watering eye sometimes with a creamy-like discharge. If the infection is allowed to continue, the area around the eye may begin to inflame and the eye will become redder. The rabbit may also experience a high temperature and have a reduced appetite.  Treating the eye infection does depend on the underlying cause.

Blocked Tear Duct
A common cause for eye infections is the blockage of a tear duct. This could be by a foreign object such as pollen, grass seed, dust or grit, however it can also be caused by the roots of the teeth pushing up into the duct, usually because of an injury or abscess.


Removal of the blockage is important, and a vet will need to administer a local anesthetic in order to flush the duct. For foreign objects, this is normally very simple, however for blockages caused by teeth, further surgery may be required.

The rabbit is normally sent home the same day on eye drops and antibiotics in order to clear up any secondary bacterial infections.

Teeth
Abscesses within the root of the tooth or injuries to the teeth can cause the eyes to become infected. Many vets will instantly assume problems with the teeth when a rabbit is admitted with weepy eyes.

To treat bad teeth, the rabbit will be given a general anesthetic. The teeth are then rasped to remove any sharp edges that are causing pain or damage.  Abscesses will need to be drained, and severely damaged teeth are usually removed.

Many rabbits may need to stay overnight at the vets, although if a rabbit is able to stay indoors they could be let home. It is important that the rabbit stays indoors to keep warm, after an anesthetic. Antibiotics will be prescribed to treat bacterial infections and a diet including an increase in hay is usually advised to help wear teeth down naturally.

Bacterial Infection
Bacterial infections can occur for a variety of reasons, including underlying causes such as foreign objects, or problems with teeth, but can also be passed on from other rabbits, or by unknown causes. Antibiotics may help to clear up bacterial infections, although in severe cases palliative care such as fluid therapy may also be necessary.

Conjunctivitis
Conjunctivitis, sometimes known as ‘Pink Eye’, is when the membranes around the eye become irritated and inflamed. It is usually caused by foreign objects, bacteria or allergens. The eyelid may swell shut, and a thick discharge is usually produced. To clear up this kind of infection, antibiotics and eye drops are administered.

Ulcerations

Fights, injuries, harsh straw and cancer can all cause eye ulcerations. Ulcers on the eye are extremely painful and the rabbit may appear to be depressed, with a reluctance to play or eat. The antibiotic, chloramphenicol is normally prescribed for rabbits with eye ulcerations.

http://www.helium.com/items/2351837-treating-eye-infections-in-rabbits



                                                                 

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Life Lessons I’ve Learned from our Rabbit



Life Lessons I’ve Learned from our Rabbit

Rabbits can teach us humans a thing or two. Not without a certain amount of wisdom did Bunny become the master of our household. Since we’ve had him, I sure have learned a few life lessons. Here are my Top 11:

Too cute to be mad at for sitting on my photography props.
  1. Mustard greens, fennel, kale, chicory, parsnips, dandelions, and collard greens exist. And they are edible.
  2. If you don’t want to do something or interact with someone, just ignore them.They will give up eventually.
  3. Whenever a situation seems sketchy, immediately run and hide. You can think about how appropriate your behavior was once you are safe.
  4. If you want something big, don’t outright ask for it. Instead, ask for a lot of little things at a time that lead up to the big thing. The person in charge can now get used to the idea one step at a time.
  5. If someone wants you to do something, don’t react immediately. Wait a few minutes and it’ll look like it was your idea.
  6. Whatever you do, make sure you look cute doing it. It’ll get you out of any trouble.
  7. You can get overweight from eating too many vegetables. Seriously, you can.

    That’s what happens when you leave your lunch on the floor.


  8. Silent begging is so much more efficient than demanding something in a noisy way.
  9. Mark your territory as your own. Even when no one is around to claim it. Better safe than sorry.
  10. Affection that had to be earned is much more valuable than affection that was given freely.
  11. Always clean up the floor and put items where they belong.
 http://bunnyapprovedblog.wordpress.com/2012/08/28/life-lessons-ive-learned-from-our-rabbit/
If you like this post, you may also enjoy:
Interesting Facts About Rabbits

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Thinking About Getting a Rabbit? How To Decide:

Thinking about getting a rabbit? Topics cover rabbit adoption, baby bunnies, and more. In essence, these articles will help you decide if a rabbit is right for you and your family.


For the complete article, please click on this link:
http://www.myhouserabbit.com/info.php





Thinking About Getting a Pet Rabbit?

Rabbits make wonderful indoor pets. They are adorable and brimming with personality. But before you swoop into the shelter and pick out a cutie, there are a few things you should know to ensure a rabbit is right for you and your family.Read more »





Preparing for Your First House Rabbit

Bringing a new pet rabbit into your life is an exciting event. You’ll want to make sure you’re fully prepared so that you and your new bunny can get off to a great start. Learn the basics of rabbit ownership, and review our checklist of initial bunny supplies.Read more »



How Much Does a Pet Rabbit Cost?

Many people may be misguided in thinking that rabbits are low-maintenance pets. The truth is that pet rabbits live 10 years or longer, and they require a considerable amount of care, time, and money. Here is a basic rundown of how much a pet rabbit can cost.Read more »


Benefits of Adopting a Pet Rabbit

Continually overrun with abandoned rabbits, local shelters and rescues are the best place to find a new pet bunny. Not only will you save an animal from possible euthanasia, there are also several additional benefits. Read more »



Children and Pet Rabbits

A house rabbit may seem like the perfect companion for your child, but this is not always the case. Adopting a rabbit is a big commitment, and it takes a family level of commitment to care for and provide a good life for a rabbit. Read more »


Easter and Bunnies 

When Easter is around the corner, many people consider buying a pet rabbit, sometimes on a whim or as a gift for small children. While rabbits do make wonderful indoor companions, people should take the time to learn the reality of pet rabbit ownership.Read more »



7 Ways Rabbits are Eco-Friendly Pets

There are many benefits to owning a pet rabbit: they’re utterly adorable, they’re funny, they’re quiet, they’re clean… I could go on and on. But one thing many people may not realize is that rabbits are ecologically-friendly pets. Read more »



About Baby Bunnies

With shelters and rescues overflowing with homeless pet rabbits, we advocate that bunny owners spay and neuter their pets so they do not breed. However, in the case that you are caring for a pregnant rabbit or new mother, here are a few basic tips.Read more »


Finding a Wild Baby Rabbit: What to Do

If you happen to spot a wild baby rabbit in your yard, your first instinct might be to “rescue” the poor, defenseless creature and care for it in your home. However, to ensure the little bunny’s best chance for survival, the best action you can take is to leave it alone.Read more »







**http://www.thebunnyhut101.com/2013/01/finding-wild-baby-bunnies.html

Monday, January 25, 2016

Nail Trimming Tips



Today we'd like to tell you about feet. 

Rabbits' hind legs are a miracle of engineering that allow them to balance, jump and thump all with the same instruments. The hind legs are far longer than the front legs for good reason. They are the springs the body uses to propel them with joints at hip, knee and hock, and far smaller joints in the toes.

The part from the hock (heel) to the toes is what we think of as the foot and it has a thick pad of fur along its underside. Part that and you'll see a pink patch on the heel itself. As long as it's pale pink, this is nothing at all to worry about as that is how it's meant to be. It's only when that pink patch becomes red, inflammed, sore and sometimes infected that you need to worry about it. This is pododermatitis or 'sore hocks' and requires veterinary treatment.


There are several things you should and shouldn't do to avoid it developing:


- Keep toenails short so that the angle of your rabbit's feet on the ground is correct.
- NEVER trim the fur off the soles of the hind feet.
- Don't give your rabbit a flooring/bedding that has no 'give' in it and especially not a wire mesh floor.
- Keep bedding and litter dry and clean.

When clipping toenails, you need to be careful not to cut into the 'quick' which is the part of the nail that contains nerves and has a blood supply. With lighter nails, it is visible. With darker nails, try shining a pen light from the opposite side of the nail so that it will show up and you don't cut too far down. You can also use the squeeze, squeeze harder, cut method. If there is no reaction to either of the squeezes of your nail scissors on the nail, then it is very likely that you are not near the sensitive part and it will be safe to cut. Always have a styptic pencil or styptic powder handy, though, in case you do accidentally go too far. Putting a dry tissue or some dry cotton wool on the open end and squeezing will help stop blood flow and then applying some styptic will help any remaining blood to clot.

 

The quick will recede if you keep clipping regularly so if you really aren't confident, nibble bits away over a period of time and the quick will take up less and less of the nail shaft, so clipping will become safer.

If none of this gives you confidence to try yourself, then ask your vet or vet nurse to do the nail trimming for you and to show you how it's done.


Two videos of how to trim your bunnies nails. 
The first with the rabbit in your lap in a normal position. 
The second sitting upright. Some bunnies like to see what's going on and they calm down.  
You can always wrap them in a towel also to protect yourself and them from kicking and hurting either of you, then clip each foot as you need to keeping them snuggled up.

Sunday, January 24, 2016

What Are Special Needs Bunnies? (Splay-Leg Buns)

Warning: this page contains pictures that may be distressing for some persons





Special needs rabbits.

The phrase calls up images of rabbits with various permanent disabilities: deaf, blind, splay-legged, paralyzed. Without doubt, such rabbits belong in this category. Yet any one of our rabbits could become a special needs rabbit should it become ill or if it should simply live until it develops some of the infirmities of old age. This is a bit of a sobering thought, but the good news is that more and more rabbits with disabilities are living happy and fulfilled lives. Many people who never dreamed they would be capable of caring for a special needs rabbit are finding it to be a tremendously rewarding experience. 
There is no question that caring for a special needs rabbit entails a lot of hard work, but those who take on the challenge invariably find it worth every second spent. They also find many of their pre-conceived ideas about special needs rabbits are changed. Anyone who is around these rabbits any length of time learns that the natural spunkiness so evident in all rabbits is especially evident in special needs rabbits. Amy Spintman, an educator with the San Diego Chapter of the House Rabbit Society, cares for both an older rabbit, Dolce, and Bijou, a rabbit who has lost the function of her legs. Amy comments that after seeing Bijou people are “. . . amazed at how interactive and responsive she is with me and can see that she still has a zest for life and a will to live.”

In fact, contrary to what one might expect, caregivers often report that their special needs rabbits are the happiest and most affectionate of their rabbits. This is simple enough to verify: ask yourself what the behaviors of a normal happy rabbit are – they are playful and affectionate, they tooth purr, dance, lick, and toss their heads. If you see those same behaviors in a special needs rabbit it means the same thing. Rabbits do not dissimulate. All special needs rabbits are basically like any other rabbit; they just require a bit of extra love and care.


Open your heart and let go of your assumptions about disabilities if you find yourself caring for a special needs bunny. You will find it endlessly rewarding and will most likely develop a deep and lasting bond with your special bun, far deeper than you ever developed with one of your normal rabbits. Nor will your rabbit be the only one who benefits. K. Marie Mead, author of a forthcoming book of true stories about house rabbits, cares for Kali, a rescued rabbit with multiple disabilities. “Kali is a teacher, a healer. I’ve gained a depth of compassion that I never had before, and that new-found strength has enabled me to work with humans and non-humans in a different and better, manner. Kali is a cherished gift, and more – she is a paradox of the highest level, from which I’m still learning.”



Rabbits with Genetic Splay-Leg
A rabbit suffering from this condition loses gradually the ability to adduct one to all four limbs. It can affect the fore- and/or hind limbs, which become twisted, so that the animal has a double-jointed posture. The rabbit can no more put weight on its limbs and ambulation becomes difficult due to the inability to adduct the limbs. The severity of the condition ranges from light to paralysis.


Young rabbit suffering from unilateral splay leg of the hind limb (arrow).
Various causes can lead to splay-leg in rabbits. The condition is frequently inherited in one or more recessive genes with reduced expressivity and possible involvement of environmental factors. Other causes have a traumatic or iatrogenic origin. They include does that have few newborn and overfeed them, or newborn that are in a nest on a slippery surface due to lack of bedding.
Rabbit suffering from three splayed limbs. Sore lesions are observed on the skin of the inner side of the posterior limbs and tail.
Treatment
There is no treatment for splay-leg, so each case should be evaluated on an individual basis. Indeed, rabbits showing light deformities can move around quite well and thus have a good quality of life. In other cases, amputation of the affected limb may be considered. For rabbits severely affected by splay-leg, euthanasia may be overweighed.
Secondary skin complications may develop, in areas that wear the body weight. Skin ulceration (sore lesions) and pododermatis are most frequently observed.





Footnotes and further reading:
http://www.medirabbit.com/EN/Bone_diseases/Genetic/splayleg.htm
http://www.houserabbitga.com/?page_id=2172
For info on General Care, Long Term Care, Types of Special Needs, and Treatments Used please see the weblink: http://www.houserabbitga.com/?page_id=2172
"Caring For Bijou": http://www.catsandrabbitsandmore.com/bijou_the_bunny
http://rabbit.org/category/care/elderly-and-special-needs/

Saturday, January 23, 2016

HAY! That's an IDEA!

Here are some great new ways to give Bunny hay!



Pretty adorable hay rack/litter box combo.
Having a top to your hay rack will discourage your bunny from jumping into the rack AND provides an awesome ledge to hang out on!





 

 




If your bunny isn't too much of a plastic chewer, this is a great set up!



 Hay tower! If you make this, make sure to secure it to a heavy wood board, so it doesn't fall over while bunny is enjoying his/her hay.






A fun, simple basket style hay rack! You could surely do this your self with very little effort.





http://www.specialbunny.org/


Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Bonding With Your Rabbit

http://m.wikihow.com/Bond-With-Your-Rabbit

 You've just brought your new rabbit home, you've got all the equipment, you've done all your research - but your new pet is scared stiff of you! However, any rabbit can be won over with time and patience - read this article to learn how to bond with your rabbit.

 
  1. Rabbits like to be interacted with at their level.

    Understand what rabbits are not. Because they look like cuddly toys, many people automatically assume rabbits love being hugged and petted - they do not. This is an extremely important step; if you try and cuddle your pet constantly, he/she will be terrified of you and you will never be able to make friends.
  2. Let your rabbit get used to his new home.
    Let your bunny get used to his home. He should have his own personal space to stay, safe from any threats, at a suitable temperature. Never intrude in your rabbit's private space; it should be his castle, his safe haven. In the meantime, remember to take care of all his needs.
  3. Let your rabbit get used to you.
    Get him/her used to your voice. Sit next to his cage every day for a few hours, reading out loud, absently chatting while you check your emails, even saying nonsensical words as you do something else. It doesn't matter what you say; just keep your voice calm, relatively quiet, and friendly. Try not to shout near your rabbit. When you think your bunny is no longer frightened of your voice, go on to the next step. Remember not to rush it!
  4. Remove distractions. You may also want to follow these steps in a small room such as a bathroom.
    Remove distractions. Get everyone and everything that might cause a distraction out of the room containing your bunny - no pets, music, etc. Try to push most of the furniture against the walls for now. Make sure there are no hazards that may harm your bunny, such as trailing cables, small spaces under furniture where he may get stuck, etc. It may be a good idea to carry the cage up to the bathroom or another small space and block spaces behind toilets, furniture, etc. for the next steps.
  5. Open your rabbit's cage's door.
    Open the door to your rabbit's cage. The door must remain open throughout this step, every time you do it. This is so that if the rabbit feels frightened, he has a safe place to go to. Make sure he can get in and out comfortably.
Sit or lie down on the floor, near the cage. Have a small treat in your hand, such as a tiny piece of apple, a small pinch of oats, or a tiny piece of banana. These foods are treats only and should not be offered often!
  • Do a quiet activity, such as reading, writing, even meditating. Just stay quiet and don't move around too much or too suddenly.


  1. Eventually, your rabbit will approach you.
    Wait. Eventually, your rabbit's curiosity will get the better of him, and he will venture out of his cage. Be patient; remember this is a big thing for your rabbit - imagine if you were in his situation. As you wait, continue doing your activity. Ignore the rabbit completely. He will eventually hop up and investigate. Still ignore him. Let him sniff you all over. If he nips or bites you, squeal to indicate pain, but otherwise stay still and quiet. If he finds the treat, let him eat it.
  2. Try  petting him. When he seems absolutely comfortable in such close quarters with you, start talking quietly, reaching out your hand. Let him see it. Don't hold your hand directly in front of him; rabbit's eyes are on the sides of their head, and he may be unable to see your hand and feel uncomfortable.
  3. Gently stroke him between his ears.
    Gently pet him between his ears. Remember to keep talking. If the rabbit seems frightened or uncomfortable, pull your hand away slowly. It may help if you make a low humming noise, as rabbits sometimes use this noise to communicate with each other.
    • Keep stroking him and letting him investigate you and the room. You can offer another tiny treat. Do not chase your bunny. Stay as quiet as possible. If the bunny hops back into his cage, let him. If you want to leave, slowly and gently close the door, talking all the while, and leave the room.
  4. Your rabbit will soon adjust to you.
    Repeat this every day. Once your rabbit truly enjoys being with you, you can start looking at other wikiHow articles and websites on how to enjoy your pet even more! After these first steps are completed, the possibilities are endless.

Saturday, January 16, 2016

POST OPERATIVE CARE FOR YOUR RABBIT

Our Exotic vet requires our bunnies to stay overnight after any surgeries. If your vet does not require this, please read this info before the surgery so you know how to care for your bun when you bring him/her home. And ALWAYS keep the vets number handy if there is any type of emergency!


CARE FOR THE FIRST 24-48 HOURS


Looking after rabbits following surgery or an anesthetic requires a degree of extra care.  They have higher rates of metabolism than larger pets, such as cats or dogs, and so are susceptible to body heat loss, dehydration and a drop in blood sugar levels.

Rabbits as a prey species are also very prone to stress and will benefit from this being minimized whilst recovering.

These potential problems are more of a risk after surgery or an anesthetic, but can be minimized  with some specific care laid out below, but guidance will be given by your vet based on the specific procedure that your rabbit is recovering from.  The basics generally remain the same.
  •  Keep your pet in a quiet, warm environment overnight once you get home.  If your rabbit(s) are not normally unduly stressed, they can be brought indoors overnight and kept in an indoor rabbit cage/dog crate or if neither are available, a pet carrier
  • For the first few days the bedding should be of a dry, soft and absorbent material such as shredded tissue paper, soft meadow hay or Vet Bed.  Avoid bedding with fine particles such as shavings and sawdust (never recommended for rabbits) as they may irritate and contaminate any wounds
  •  Provide fresh water.
  • Provide food straight away. This should be their usual variety, with no special and unfamiliar treats as this may upset their digestion
  • Ensure that your rabbit(s) eat within 12-24 hours of coming home and monitor output of poos in that time.   Whilst your rabbit(s) may be quieter than normal for 24-48 hours, it is important to see evidence of eating, drinking and pooing.
  • .Rabbits should not be allowed to exercise overly for a few days to help their wounds repair e.g. not using a ramp in multiple floor housing, using a run, and not playing with exercise toys such as tunnels/stools/jump boxes/steps
  •  Rabbits (and/or their partners) can be inclined to lick and chew their wounds and stitches, so it is important to check them several times a day
  •  Already bonded (paired) rabbits should remain together throughout any visits to the vets And traveling to reduce stress, unless this is contra- indicated (e.g. risk of mating, inability to nurse with partner rabbit in situ., risk to partner rabbits health)
  • Complete any course of medication prescribed to you to give your pet
  •  If you are concerned about your rabbit(s) recovery for any reason, please telephone your vet immediately
 It is important that rabbits do eat as soon as possible after any procedure and that their gut keeps working normally.  In order to help this happen the vet will normally give some particular drugs/treatments prior to your rabbit leaving the surgery to come home.  These would normally include :

24 hour pain relief
gut stimulant
fluids
syringe food

Your rabbit will normally be back to normal in a few days, and should have a followup consultation with your vet to ensure that he or she is happy with progress.

Please note following neutering, both mature males and mature females can remain hormonal for between 4-6 weeks and that males are still capable of breeding for up to 6 weeks post op. 

THE ABOVE IS NOT A VETERINARY OPINION OR GUIDE, BUT IS BASED ON MY OWN PERSONAL LAYPERSON'S EXPERIENCE. SHOULD YOU BE ANY WAY CONCERNED ABOUT YOUR RABBITS POST OPERATIVE CARE, THEN PLEASE DISCUSS IT WITH YOUR VETERINARY SURGEON.


https://www.facebook.com/notes/the-rabbit-crossing/post-operative-care-for-your-rabbit/488706554506410 



Who Am I?



Thursday, January 14, 2016

Thinking About Getting a Rabbit? How To Decide:

Thinking about getting a rabbit? Topics cover rabbit adoption, baby bunnies, and more. In essence, these articles will help you decide if a rabbit is right for you and your family.

For the complete article, please click on this link:
http://www.myhouserabbit.com/info.php


  • Helicopter ear bunny

    Thinking About Getting a Pet Rabbit?

    Rabbits make wonderful indoor pets. They are adorable and brimming with personality. But before you swoop into the shelter and pick out a cutie, there are a few things you should know to ensure a rabbit is right for you and your family. [Read more]
  • Agouti mini lop rabbit

    Benefits of Adopting a Pet Rabbit

    Continually overrun with abandoned rabbits, local shelters and rescues are the best place to find a new pet bunny. Not only will you save an animal from possible euthanasia, there are also several additional benefits. [Read more]
  • Children and rabbits

    Children and Pet Rabbits

    A house rabbit may seem like the perfect companion for your child, but this is not always the case. Adopting a rabbit is a a big commitment, and it takes a family level of commitment to care for and provide a good life for a rabbit. [Read more]
  • Rabbit face

    Easter and Bunnies

    When Easter is around the corner, many people consider buying a pet rabbit, sometimes on a whim or as a gift for small children. While rabbits do make wonderful indoor companions, people should take the time to learn the reality of pet rabbit ownership. [Read more]
  • Rabbits in harmony with nature

    7 Ways Rabbits are Environmentally-Friendly Pets

    There are many benefits to owning a pet rabbit: they're utterly adorable, they're funny, they're quiet, they're clean... I could go on and on. But one thing many people may not realize is that rabbits are ecologically-friendly pets. [Read more]
  • Baby bunnies

    About Baby Bunnies

    Well, first, if you want to have bunny babies you should read everything you can on the subject and also talk to your local animal shelters and rabbit rescue organizations. Here are a few essentials you'll need to know about rabbit babies. [Read more]
  • Wild baby rabbits in a nest

    Finding a Wild Baby Rabbit: What to Do

    If you happen to spot a wild baby rabbit in your yard, your first instinct might be to "rescue" the poor, defenseless creature and care for it in your home. However, to ensure the little bunny's best chance for survival, the best action you can take is to leave it alone. [Read More)
http://www.thebunnyhut101.com/2013/01/finding-wild-baby-bunnies.html